Business continuity investment on the rise

The pandemic has accelerated the introduction of a more structured business continuity programmes, with a greater expectation of investment in the year ahead, according to the Business Continuity Institute’s 2021 Horizon Scan Report.

Non-occupational disease has found its way to the top of the list of business risks, with a lack of preparedness cited as the main reason for disruption. This, the BCI says, is in stark contrast with the previous year’s results, which saw non-occupational disease near the bottom of the list of concerns.

The impact of the pandemic has also led to intensified risks elsewhere, stretching beyond the loss of life. Health incidents are reported as the second most common source of disruption over the last 12 months, with mental health issues the top issue experienced by employees.

Cyber attacks and IT/telecom outages were fourth and fifth on the list, after a year of home working. Political risks and violence returning to the top 10 for the first time in three years. Climate risks were the highest concern for the BCI’s members, with more incidents of extreme weather expected and more governments setting environmental targets, such as the UK’s 2050 net zero target.

    Share Story:

Recent Stories


Are property insurers ready for timber
The Structural Timber Association is gearing up to help all stakeholders in the construction supply chain to fully appreciate the advantages of building in timber, how to deliver such projects and most importantly to understand and manage the risks.

The changing face of BC and WAR
The working environment has changed quite dramatically for many over the last six months. With social distancing and the rise of homeworking, it is not just how businesses operate that has changed, but also how they recover. In this podcast we discuss some of the challenges created by the quick shift to home working, why the office may not have seen its last days and how the current environment can impact the ability of a business to recover.

Advertisement